Man and God – Part Three – Scarcity

In a previous post, I discussed the concept of particulars.  Perhaps then, a reader might have wondered what this has to do with Christian issues and values, and certainly what does it have to do with a certain hypothesis I repeated from Man and God – Part One:

“Try to consider the possibility that God created and continues to create only good things.  And try to imagine that no good thing can stray from being a good thing; for to see such happen would render God as less than good himself.   Now consider, therefore, that mankind is thus good and has not strayed from the course that God set forth for mankind when created.” 

“Mankind is evolving; this we must acknowledge, for man has changed in all ways physically and intellectually since recorded, historical evidence began, and therefore, this evolution is and must be of God’s will.  Now, here comes the hard part for many.  Now imagine that where man is today and where man will be tomorrow is also in God’s plan and of God’s will.”

Continue reading Man and God – Part Three – Scarcity

The Commonality of Faith

Portrait of a boy with the map of the world painted on his face.

In the modern, secular world, the average citizen has lost the appreciation of just how fundamental religious identity is to our basic existence.  The secularist – remote to the religious experience all about them each and every day – sees religion as a membership in an organization; a simple choice that can be flipped with an opportunistic lifestyle, a change in schedule, or a little enlightenment.  The results of such a naiveté is just beginning to roost like gargoyles on the growing discord we call diversity.

But religion is not an organization with a human leadership that shops for designer bargains at a factory-outlet store.  Religion isn’t just tucked neatly within the prefrontal cortex of the brain; ready to be affected by neuroplasticity brought about by human events.  Religion has demonstrated that it is much more pervasive and prevailing in all human cultures; signaling that it is embodied within every cell within every human body.  It is not likely to go away with a “shoo”, or retreat to its dog house with a “bad doggie”.

Continue reading The Commonality of Faith

This Matter of Freedom of Speech

Je Suis Charlie Blood

This post came out of a sense I developed over the past two days that freedom, liberty, and equality are all perfected in their limits, rather than their excesses. This is the foundation of the teachings of Jesus Christ; that in love of God and man, and in practicing that love of God and man, we all have chosen to put aside what divides us in favor of what unites us.

After the horrible shootings at the offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris – leaving twelve dead, and eleven wounded – the politicians and journalists of the western nations all professed a unified theme of freedom of speech; the right to say what you want, when you want to say it, without the fear of a reprisal that would cause some form of immediate harm to the person exercising such a freedom. I had thought I could stop defining freedom of speech with just those three words, “freedom-of-speech”, but I immediately realized that there is no such thing as freedom of speech without the accompanied and reactionary or complimentary thinking and action that results from the observers of such a freedom.

Continue reading This Matter of Freedom of Speech

The Rights of Evil – Part 5.

The DoorAnd So What About God?

First of all, it is not about God.  Man is not so much rejecting God as he is rejecting his own self.  Mankind is like the child that will hold its breath in order to get its way with the parent, but at some point the child has to accept the fact that breathing is an absolute part of its existence.  Have you ever noticed that children only hold their breath as a maneuver with their parents?  Do you actually believe it would work on one’s peers?  Think about that.  But, of course, having merely held its breath, the child considers that a milestone to be reckoned with, and an advancement to its cause of independence and authority.  “Don’t mess with me.” Continue reading The Rights of Evil – Part 5.

On the Pride of Self-Regard

A Jewish man blows the Shofra at the Western Wall in the Old City of JerusalemA few days back I memorized the Act of Contrition, a Catholic prayer of confession of sin. It is a beautiful prayer of repentance, intent, and hope that I will repeat daily throughout the remainder of my life.  Recently I had the opportunity to look deep into this prayer’s meaning and use by modern man as I drove my car on an errand.

Turning on my radio, I found myself listening to a discussion on EWTN radio regarding the matter of sin in our American society.  The protagonist speaker continually referred to those secular or atheist people who viewed sin as if it were a moral strength or virtue.  He noted that our media, whether it be television entertainment programming or skewed journalism (I agreed with him that there is no unbiased news reporting anymore), has saturated our society’s essence with acts of sin – adultery for example – portrayed as justifiable behavior for an intelligent, caring human being.   I agreed with him.  It is the primary reason our family has no television in our household.  There simply is no way to exclude such sanctions of illicit behavior when watching and listening to television programing.

As I listened, I knew one thing and then affirmed another.  First, that I have heard this discourse many times before.  The spiritual prophets are many who see our destruction through the corruption of our media – the great providReality TV 1er of knowledge, freedom, and television based upon some form of reality (supposedly) in people’s lives.  That thought, in itself, did not urge me to change the channel, but it did lead me to an affirmation of a belief that I have long acknowledged and wish to discuss here.

This recurring theme, by our well-meaning, Christian prophets, of a call to our secular society to repentance and “to sin no more” – quoting the Act of Contrition – can be an exercise in futility.  Not because the goal is unattainable.  All men and women are loved by God, no matter what the quality of their nature, and they all have an equal opportunity to seek God, to find His grace and forgiveness, and to become justified through repentance and a sincere desire to lead a life in avoidance of temptation to sin.  What makes the prophets’ call to repentance potentially unattainable is that they assume too much of their listening audience. Continue reading On the Pride of Self-Regard